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Orlando shooter described himself as ‘Islamic soldier’ in 911 calls to police

U.S. federal investigators have released a partial transcript Monday of the conversations between Omar Mateen, the gunman who murdered 49 people within the Pulse Nightclub, and Orlando police negotiators.

The redacted transcript revealed more details into the deadly mass shooting that occurred a week ago. The agency said in a statement they will not be releasing audio of the shooter’s 911 calls at this time out of respect for the victims of this horrific tragedy.

Partial transcript of 911 call between Orlando nightclub shooter Omar Mateen, dispatch

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Partial transcript of 911 call between Orlando nightclub shooter Omar Mateen, dispatch

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FBI releases partial transcripts of Orlando shooter Omar Mateen’s 911 call

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Below is the partial transcript between the Orlando police department and the gunman which took place in the early morning hours of Sunday, June 12, 2016.

Orlando Police Dispatcher (OD)
Shooter Omar Mateen (OM)

OD: Emergency 911, this is being recorded.
OM: In the name of God the Merciful, the beneficial [in Arabic]
OD: What?
OM: Praise be to God, and prayers as well as peace be upon the prophet of God [in Arabic]. I let you know, I’m in Orlando and I did the shootings.

ChangSha Night Net

OD: What’s your name?
OM: My name is I pledge of allegiance to [omitted].
OD: Ok, What’s your name?
OM: I pledge allegiance to [omitted] may God protect him [in Arabic], on behalf of [omitted].
OD: Alright, where are you at?
OM: In Orlando.
OD: Where in Orlando?

[End of call.]

During the 50-second call with a dispatcher, Mateen “made murderous statements in a “chilling, calm and deliberate manner,” said Ronald Hopper, FBI assistant special agent in charge in Orlando.

However, there is no evidence Mateen was directed by a foreign terrorist group, and he was radicalized on his own, Hopper said.

Mateen’s name and the groups and people to whom he pledged allegiance were omitted from the excerpt. But the FBI has previously said he pledged allegiance to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State.

According to the FBI, Omar Mateen identified himself as an “Islamic soldier” and told the negotiator that America needs to stop bombing Syria and Iraq and that is why he was “out here right now.”

When the crisis negotiator asked the shooter what he had done, the shooter stated, “No, you already know what I did.”

“There is some vehicle outside that has some bombs, just to let you know. You people are gonna get it, and I’m gonna ignite it if they try to do anything stupid,” Mateen said.

Later in the call with the crisis negotiator, the shooter stated that he had a vest, and further described it as the kind they “used in France,” an apparent reference to the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.

“In the next few days, you’re going to see more of this type of action going on,” Mateen said before hanging up.

The release comes a day after tens of thousands of people held a candlelight vigil in the heart of downtown Orlando for the 49 victims who died in the massacre. The victims also were remembered at church services and at makeshift memorials throughout Orlando.

WATCH: Thousands of people gathered Sunday to remember and honor the victims. Hena Daniels reports.

“As a community, it’s important that we gather together to show our support because only together can we move forward,” said Gabrielle Claire, a musician and Universal Orlando worker who says she knew three Pulse victims who died. She was holding a “Hugs for Healing” sign at the vigil and numerous strangers came up to hug her.

READ MORE: Pride and mourning, as funerals and demonstrations overtake Orlando

“We don’t have to be afraid of holding each other. We don’t have to be afraid of saying to other people, ‘I’m here for you,”‘ she said.

Lynch said in interviews Sunday on several news shows that the FBI would release a partial, printed transcript of the conversations between gunman Omar Mateen from within the Pulse nightclub and Orlando police negotiators. Armed with a semi-automatic weapon, Mateen went on a bloody rampage at the club June 12 that left 49 people dead and 53 others seriously hurt. Mateen died in a hail of gunfire after police stormed the venue.

Lynch told ABC’s “This Week” that the top goal while intensifying pressure on the Islamic State – the extremist group thought to have inspired Mateen – is to build a complete profile of him in order to help prevent another massacre like Orlando.

WATCH: Orlando nightclub shooter signed over property prior to rampage; funerals for victims continue. Aarti Pole reports.

“As you can see from this investigation, we are going back and learning everything we can about this killer, about his contacts, people who may have known him or seen him. And we’re trying to build that profile so that we can move forward,” Lynch said.

Lynch said she would be travelling to Orlando on Tuesday to meet with investigators.

Speaking to CBS’ “Face The Nation,” Lynch said that a key goal of the investigation was to determine why Mateen targeted the gay community. The victims were predominantly gay and Hispanic since it was “Latin night” at Pulse.

“We are hurting. We are exhausted, confused, and there is so much grief,” said Larry Watchorn, a ministerial intern, during a sermon Sunday at Joy Metropolitan Community Church in Orlando, whose congregants are predominantly gay.

READ MORE: ‘You just smelled death in the air’: Orlando shooting victim played dead to survive

Florida Gov. Rick Scott described the attack as “devastating” while praying at the First Baptist Church of Orlando on Sunday. He said the gunman targeted “two very vulnerable populations.”

“But here is the positive out of it … people have come together,” Scott said. “There are so many people who have done so many wonderful acts.”

Around Orlando, people left balloons, flowers, pictures and posters at a makeshift memorial in front of the city’s new performing arts centre and at Orlando Regional Medical Center where 49 white crosses were emblazoned with red hearts and the names of the victims.

The crosses were built by a Chicago carpenter with a history of constructing crosses for victims of mass shootings. Greg Zanis drove from Illinois to Orlando last week and installed the crosses at the medical centre, where many of the 53 shooting victims who survived were taken for treatment.

WATCH: Thousands gather in Orlando for candlelight vigil to honour Pulse nightclub victims

He said Sunday that the crosses are a message for people of all faiths: “Quit judging and start loving.”

A rainbow appeared over Lake Eola Park Sunday evening as tens of thousands of people turned out for an evening vigil to honour the victims of the shooting. The park was filled with people holding white flowers, American flags and candles.

READ MORE: Orlando shooter Omar Mateen’s school records show disruptive, violent pattern

One of those people attending, Traci Hines-McKenzie, said the timing of the rainbow was perfect.

“You know that’s a sign,” she said.

Dr. Khurshid Ahmed was part of a group of Muslim-Americans at the vigil who held signs reading, “Muslims Condemn Extremism.” Investigators have said Mateen reportedly pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group, and a letter from the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Republican Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, said Mateen wrote on Facebook that “real Muslims will never accept the filthy ways of the West.”

At the end of the vigil, people held up their candles as the names of each victim were read, creating a ring of fire around Lake Eola. They chanted “One Orlando,” “Orlando United” and “Somos Orlando,” Spanish for “We are Orlando.”

“That event has gotten the attention of the world,” said Evania Nichols, an Orlando resident. “And, for Orlando – a city that’s always been incredibly inclusive no matter your skin colour, no matter your background – it’s brought about a movement that I think is starting here and I really hope continues.”

*With files from Global News