Toronto arborist calls for better tree maintenance at Trinity Bellwoods Park


Summary

Just days after a man died after being struck by a falling tree branch in Trinity Bellwoods Park, a Toronto arborist reflected on when he and his two-year-old son were almost hit by a large branch in the same park.

“Had we been four feet to the right, it might have landed on our heads and it was a pretty big piece of wood,” Andrew Baughn told Global News. “I was surprised was in the tree at all. It should have been cleaned up,”

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“To hear that someone had died, a couple hundred yards from my front door in the park that I walk with my son everyday was heartbreaking,” he added.

Baughn said he has called City of Toronto’s 311 line to raise concerns about the upkeep of trees in the park.

“The city’s approach to tree care is reactive,” he said.

Baughn said he wants city staff to take a more aggressive approach to maintenance.

“Taking a proactive approach to tree care means annual inspections and regular pruning schedules, going around after a big storm and inspecting the trees,” he said. “[The city] has to be very strict about what trees they are leaving standing here and I don’t think a reactive approach is adequate.”

READ MORE: Man struck, killed by falling tree branch in popular Toronto park

When asked for comment on Sunday, the City of Toronto sent a statement to Global News saying city staff aim to proactively prune municipally-owned trees every seven to 10 years.

“The City of Toronto inspects over 150,000 trees a year and over the past 10 years Urban Forestry staff have responded to over 160 service requests, performed over 120 inspections and completed over 240 work orders relating to trees within Trinity Bellwoods Park,” the statement read in part, adding city staff are working to complete their investigation as soon as possible.

Matthew Cutler, a parks, forestry and recreation office spokesperson, said parks and forestry staff were on site Friday night and Saturday morning to assist with the investigation.

“The branch has been removed to one of our facilities for further inspection. Forestry staff inspected the tree Saturday morning and, finding it in good health, have reopened that area of the park to the public,” Cutler wrote.

“We will continue to search for an explanation for this tragic incident and send our condolences to the victim and their family.”


Just days after a man died after being struck by a falling tree branch in Trinity Bellwoods Park, a Toronto arborist reflected on when he and his two-year-old son were almost hit by a large branch in the same park.

“Had we been four feet to the right, it might have landed on our heads and it was a pretty big piece of wood,” Andrew Baughn told Global News. “I was surprised was in the tree at all. It should have been cleaned up,”

ChangSha Night Net

“To hear that someone had died, a couple hundred yards from my front door in the park that I walk with my son everyday was heartbreaking,” he added.

Baughn said he has called City of Toronto’s 311 line to raise concerns about the upkeep of trees in the park.

“The city’s approach to tree care is reactive,” he said.

Baughn said he wants city staff to take a more aggressive approach to maintenance.

“Taking a proactive approach to tree care means annual inspections and regular pruning schedules, going around after a big storm and inspecting the trees,” he said. “[The city] has to be very strict about what trees they are leaving standing here and I don’t think a reactive approach is adequate.”

READ MORE: Man struck, killed by falling tree branch in popular Toronto park

When asked for comment on Sunday, the City of Toronto sent a statement to Global News saying city staff aim to proactively prune municipally-owned trees every seven to 10 years.

“The City of Toronto inspects over 150,000 trees a year and over the past 10 years Urban Forestry staff have responded to over 160 service requests, performed over 120 inspections and completed over 240 work orders relating to trees within Trinity Bellwoods Park,” the statement read in part, adding city staff are working to complete their investigation as soon as possible.

Matthew Cutler, a parks, forestry and recreation office spokesperson, said parks and forestry staff were on site Friday night and Saturday morning to assist with the investigation.

“The branch has been removed to one of our facilities for further inspection. Forestry staff inspected the tree Saturday morning and, finding it in good health, have reopened that area of the park to the public,” Cutler wrote.

“We will continue to search for an explanation for this tragic incident and send our condolences to the victim and their family.”